Engineering quartz is non-porous, durable and resistant to scratches and stains material which consists of 95% natural stone and 5% resin binders and pigments. At the exhibition Kitchen & Bath Industry 2020, which took place January 21-23 in Las Vegas, this material is pushed even traditional marble.

# 1. Very dark color
Among the most noticeable trends of the exhibition was the emergence of collections of very dark engineering quartz — coal black, slate grey, dark green and blue. One of the most interesting variants was the material Dekton from Laurent with a dark brown background with Golden veins.

Photo: close-up Laurent from Dekton — artificial stone, inspired by marble Port Laurent Moroccan deposits

Dark collection was shown at the exhibition and the company Caesarstone (line is called the Dark collection), which included a new dramatic shades, including matte Black Tempal (pictured).

Pictured above: the material in this new shade Oxidian (with the effect of rust, shades of dark gray and blue) from Caesarstone was used for facing of facades of kitchen Islands

Photo: near clearly seen as on a matte surface Oxidian from Caesarstone created the textured effect of rust

The Cambria company, which this year celebrates its 20th anniversary, shown at the exhibition of 20 new options for kitchen countertops. Among them, two deep, dark hue: Woodcroft (pictured) with metal flecks and gold veins and Charlestown — dark graphite color.

Photo: the shade from Charlestown Cambria’s with a whimsical grey and white streaks

In the collection of the Portfolio from Dekton was also new shades and they are all dark. A variant of Bromo (photo used for veneer kitchen cabinets and countertops) — with a deep Navy blue shade, reminiscent of slate.

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For other collection — Liquid — designers Dekton and London Studio Patternity inspired by flowing and solidifying of magma, giving the material its coal-black hue and curves frozen “movement”.

On the pictures clearly visible interesting figure “running” streak, tint, Liquid Embers, Dekton

And the collection Chromica Dekton has released two sophisticated frosted shades, Baltic (pictured) — under the dark blue quartz and dark green Feroe.

Photo: the shade of Feroe from the call. Chromica, Dekton

Turkish company Coante producing engineering quartz, showed a dark matte shades, which are increasingly in Vogue.

# 2. Triumph blue
New shades of quartz shown at the exhibition as a companion to deep blue. So, in a new collection of twenty colors from Cambria comes with a shade Portrush (pictured), presented here in the form of kitchen countertops. Its white base is crossed by waves of dark blue, gray and black veining with small patches of Golden sparks.

At the surface Portrush from Cambria visible shade of blue

Turquoise blue Skye from Cambria is not included in the new collection, but it perfectly complements. Above is an example of the use of color on the accent wall in the bathroom.

Accents of blue there are in the engineering quartz granite-Islington from Cambria. Game gray, white and blue colors on the surface of the countertop makes this material one of the main accents of the kitchen.

# 3. Golden sparks in stone
Gold accents appear not only in the form of brass handles, faucets or fittings of household appliances, but on counters and aprons. In the above example is a shade of Clovelly from Cambria with a cream background, copper and brown streaks.

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Photo: a closeup of shade Clovelly from Cambria

# 4. Gray cracks and divorces
Grey veins on a white background do not pass positions. But in engineering stone, they become more difficult: “break” and intersect as cracks on the weathered surface, spread with watercolor stains.

Above is an example with a hint of Queensbury from Cambria, which is used for table top and apron.

Photo: close-up of Queensbury countertops from Cambria; grey streaks form a complex picture, Recalling the chips and cracks in crystalline rocks

Grey watercolor “blur” Liquid Sky from Dekton

# 5. Naturalistic simulation of rare stone
Although marble imitate quite often, designers are inspired by other natural stones. For example, Khalo from Dekton recalls the beauty of the Patagonian granite with splashes of black, gold and coffee.

In the photo closeup: Khalo, Dekton

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